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Nanotechnology Spotlight

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Showing Spotlights 113 - 120 of 123 in category Sensors, Sensing Applications (newest first):

 

Performance limits of nanobiosensors

Nanoscale sensors based on silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes are capable of detecting molecules at ultra low concentrations. The potential applications include early detection of cancer and fast sequencing of genome. However, for these applications, the time taken by the sensor to reach stable response is crucial. This time is dictated by the diffusion of molecules (e.g. cancer markers) through the solution and their subsequent capture at the sensor surface. Researchers at Purdue University show that this response is governed by the geometry of diffusion of the system and that nanobiosensors are capable of detecting bio-molecules at much lower concentration than the classical planar sensors.

Posted: Jul 19th, 2006

A zinc oxide nanocomb biosensor for glucose detection

New research shows that ZnO nanostructures are suitable for electrochemical biosensors. The enzyme used for glucose detection, glucose oxidase, was attached to ZnO nanocombs which resulted in a biosensor that exhibits a high affinity, high sensitivity, and fast response for glucose detection. This simple method of fabricating ZnO based biosensor can be extended to immobilize other enzymes and other bioactive molecules on various 1D metal oxide nanostructures, and form versatile electrodes for biosensor studies.

Posted: Jul 3rd, 2006

A novel approach for the design of fluorescent sensors

Researchers in Germany report a novel approach for the design of environmental sensors based on fluorescence interference contrast (FLIC) of semiconductor nanocrystals near a reflecting silicon surface. Their method is based on nanocrystals incorporated into polymer layers grafted onto reflecting surfaces.

Posted: Jun 14th, 2006

Acoustic sensors made from magnetic nanowires

Researchers took inspiration from the packaging and transduction processes of the cochlea and cilia in the inner ear to design acoustic sensors made from nanowires. Specifically, they used nanowires of magnetostrictive materials as artificial cilia to sense acoustic signals. Any acoustic sensor application may benefit from this work.

Posted: Jun 13th, 2006

3-dimensional nanowire networks make for ultrasensitive and highly selective gas sensors

The sensitivity of solid-state gas sensors can be improved if the surface-to-volume ratio of the material used for the sensor is increased. An international group of researchers demonstrated that three-dimensional tungsten oxide nanowire networks can serve as a high-surface area material for building ultrasensitive and highly selective gas sensors. The results highlight that the 3-D nanowires technology can be adopted for the development of gas sensors with performances suitable for practical applications.

Posted: Jun 8th, 2006

Researchers use nanoscale zinc oxide structures to detect anthrax

A new approach promotes the use of zinc oxide nanomaterials as signal enhancing platforms for rapid, multiplexed, high-throughput, highly sensitive, DNA sensor arrays. Engineered nanoscale ZnO structures can be effectively used for the identification of the biothreat agent, Bacillus anthracis, by successfully discriminating its DNA sequence from other genetically related species.

Posted: Jun 6th, 2006

Attaching biomolecules to carbon nanotubes

Among the many potential biology-related applications proposed for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are high-sensitivity biosensors and bio-fuel cells. In order to create the synergy between the biomolecules and CNTs required to realize these applications, biomolecules, such as proteins and DNAs, must be connected to the CNTs.

Posted: May 19th, 2006

Towards single-particle laboratories

Researchers at Cornell University have developed a novel quantitative nanoparticle-based sensor of chemical concentrations based on organic dye molecules covalently integrated into the matrix of silica nanoparticles. This is the first work that implements an optimized core-shell architecture for such sensor particles.

Posted: May 8th, 2006