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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Successful workshop "Energy and Innovation"

The enormous changes with respect to how we handle and consume energy and the impact on the environment are of great concern not only to us as scientists, but also to all of us as responsible citizen. Therefore, the PhD students of the International Doctorate Program NanoBioTechnology had the wish to establish a discussion with experts from relevant fields to get a deep insight into the technical, economic and social preconditions necessary for the creation of a truly sustainable energy supply system.

Posted: Apr 21st, 2011

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New DNA nanoforms take shape (w/video)

Miniature architectural forms - some no larger than viruses - have been constructed through a revolutionary technique known as DNA origami. Now, Hao Yan, Yan Liu and their colleagues at ASU's Biodesign Institute have expanded the capability of this method to construct arbitrary, two- and three-dimensional shapes, mimicking those commonly found in nature.

Posted: Apr 21st, 2011

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Limit to top-down nanotechnology mass-production?

A leading nanotechnology scientist has raised questions over a billion dollar industry by boldly claiming that there is a limit to how small nanotechnology materials can be mass produced. He says that you cannot mass produce structures with a diameter of three nanometres or less using a top-down approach.

Posted: Apr 21st, 2011

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New research moves nanomedicine one step closer to reality

A class of engineered nanoparticles - gold-centered spheres smaller than viruses - has been shown safe when administered by two alternative routes in a mouse study led by investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine. This marks the first step up the ladder of toxicology studies that, within a year and a half, could yield to human trials of the tiny agents for detection of colorectal and possibly other cancers.

Posted: Apr 20th, 2011

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A scratched coating heals itself

Your 6-year-old found a nail in the garage and drew pictures across the side of your new car. Gnash your teeth now, but researchers at Case Western Reserve University, U.S., say the fix-up may be cheap and easy to do yourself in the not-too-distant future. Together with partners in the USA and Switzerland, they have developed a polymer-based material that can heal itself when placed under ultraviolet light for less than a minute.

Posted: Apr 20th, 2011

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Nature's elegant solution to repairing DNA in cancer, other conditions

A major discovery about an enzyme's structure has opened a window on understanding DNA repair. Scientists at Duke University Medical Center have determined the structure of a nuclease that will help scientists to understand several DNA repair pathways, a welcome development for cancer research.

Posted: Apr 20th, 2011

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Diamond centre defect helps scientists measure electrical fields

Scientists recognise how important a role electrical fields play in nature and technical areas. By adjusting these fields, the transmission of nerve impulses becomes possible and the operation of modern data storage is fulfilled by saving electrical charges (so-called Flash Memories). What researchers have not been able to do is get an ultra-precise reading of electrical fields by using physical measurement techniques. Until now, that is. With the help of one single defect centre in diamond, scientists at the University of Stuttgart in Germany successfully measured electrical fields.

Posted: Apr 20th, 2011

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First Sino-EU symposium on nanotechnology in consumer products

As a follow-up of the establishment of a Memorandum of Understanding between the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection and the Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine (CIAQ), signed in June 2010, the first Sino-EU Symposium on nanotechnology in consumer products was held on 14-15 April 2011 in Beijing.

Posted: Apr 20th, 2011

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Dissecting the intracellular transport mechanism

Researchers have now deciphered how one of the intracellular transport complexes from yeast cells recognizes its cargo mRNA and initiates assembly. The new findings might also be applicable to higher organisms, where transport processes are especially critical for cell function.

Posted: Apr 20th, 2011

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Optogenetic technology holds promise for treating human blindness

There is currently no cure for retinitis pigmentosa, but scientists are working on ways to restore vision by making other cells of the retina, which are spared by the disease, sensitive to light. In a new study of mice, researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) used technology developed by a consortium of institutions, including MIT, to do just that. By inducing light sensitivity in other cells of the retina, they brought back enough vision for the mice to navigate a maze.

Posted: Apr 20th, 2011

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