Open menu

Space Exploration News

The latest news about space exploration and technologies,
astrophysics, cosmology, the universe...

RSS Subscribe to our Space Exploration News feed

Infant solar system shows signs of windy weather

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array have observed what may be the first-ever signs of windy weather around a T Tauri star, an infant analog of our own Sun. This may help explain why some T Tauri stars have disks that glow weirdly in infrared light while others shine in a more expected fashion.

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2014

Read more

Where is that spacecraft?

Space surveillance is inherently challenging when compared to other tracking environments due to various reasons, not least of which is the long time gap between surveillance updates. Scientists propose a more statistically rigorous treatment of uncertainty in the near-Earth space environment than currently available.

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2014

Read more

Finding hints of gravitational waves in the stars

Scientists have shown how gravitational waves might be 'seen' by looking at the stars. The new model proposes that a star that oscillates at the same frequency as a gravitational wave will absorb energy from that wave and brighten, an overlooked prediction of Einstein's 1916 theory of general relativity. The study contradicts previous assumptions about the behavior of gravitational waves.

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2014

Read more

Shrink-wrapping spacesuits

The BioSuit is a skintight spacesuit that offers improved mobility and reduced mass compared to modern gas-pressurized spacesuits.

Posted: Sep 19th, 2014

Read more

Monster galaxies gain weight by eating smaller neighbors

Research to be published this Friday shows that massive galaxies in the universe have stopped making their own stars and are instead 'snacking' on nearby galaxies. Astronomers looked at more than 22,000 galaxies and found that while smaller galaxies are very efficient at creating stars from gas, the most massive galaxies are much less efficient at star formation, producing hardly any new stars themselves, and instead grow by eating other galaxies.

Posted: Sep 19th, 2014

Read more

Miranda: An icy moon deformed by tidal heating

Miranda, a small, icy moon of Uranus, is one of the most visually striking and enigmatic bodies in the solar system. Despite its relatively small size, Miranda appears to have experienced an episode of intense resurfacing that resulted in the formation of at least three remarkable and unique surface features - polygonal-shaped regions called coronae.

Posted: Sep 18th, 2014

Read more

Reinterpreting dark matter

New research explores cold dark matter in depth and proposes new answers about the formation of galaxies and the structure of the universe. These predictions are being contrasted with fresh data provided by the Hubble space telescope.

Posted: Sep 17th, 2014

Read more

'J' marks the spot for Rosetta's lander

Rosetta's lander Philae will target Site J, an intriguing region on Comet 67P/Churyumov?Gerasimenko that offers unique scientific potential, with hints of activity nearby, and minimum risk to the lander compared to the other candidate sites.

Posted: Sep 15th, 2014

Read more

Unravelling the mysteries of the Venusian atmosphere (w/video)

Underscoring the vast differences between Earth and its neighbor Venus, new research shows a glimpse of giant holes in the electrically charged layer of the Venusian atmosphere, called the ionosphere. The observations point to a more complicated magnetic environment than previously thought - which in turn helps us better understand this neighboring, rocky planet.

Posted: Sep 12th, 2014

Read more

Astronomers unveil secrets of giant elliptical galaxies

New findings of how giant elliptical galaxies move have been discovered by an international team of astronomers using the newly installed Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the European Southern Observatory?s (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) facility.

Posted: Sep 12th, 2014

Read more

NASA research gives guideline for future alien life search

Astronomers searching the atmospheres of alien worlds for gases that might be produced by life can't rely on the detection of just one type, such as oxygen, ozone, or methane, because in some cases these gases can be produced non-biologically, according to extensive simulations by researchers in the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory.

Posted: Sep 12th, 2014

Read more