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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

NISE NanoDays 2008

NISE (the Nanoscale Informal Science Eductaion) Net has identified March 29–April 6, 2008, as the dates for NanoDays, a week of community-based educational outreach events to raise public awareness of nanoscale science and engineering. NISE Net will provide basic materials and facilitation to support the planning of these events in local communities across the United States.

Posted: Jan 10th, 2008

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Scientists use nano manufacturing processes to construct new materials with tailored properties

Scientists have only been able to take naturally occurring materials so far when it comes to their physics and chemical properties. What they do in their natural form is simply what they do. They can't do any more by themselves, though compounds combining several different materials have been used to extend base abilities. Now, scientists are finding out that through nano construction processes, they can custom build new materials that don't naturally occur in nature, with some amazing properties.

Posted: Jan 10th, 2008

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How nanocones could help you stay dry

Were you soaked in last summer's heavy rainstorms? John Simpson, a senior research scientist at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, has developed a new super-water-repellent coating that might make a dismal British summer more bearable.

Posted: Jan 9th, 2008

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NIST develops test method for key micromechanical property

Engineers and researchers designing and building new microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) can benefit from a new test method developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure a key mechanical property of such systems: elasticity. The new method determines the Young's modulus of thin films not only for MEMS devices but also for semiconductor devices in integrated circuits.

Posted: Jan 9th, 2008

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Tiny and tinier: EU projects minimize size of semiconductor chips

Two EU-funded projects have been pushing the limits of chip miniaturization, trying to make complementary metal-oxide semiconductor chips (CMOS) even smaller than they already are. While the NanoCMOS project, which was completed in 2006, helped develop 45 nanometer (nm) node semiconductors, its follow-up project NANOPULL is aiming at 32nm and ultimately 22nm features.

Posted: Jan 9th, 2008

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Safenano launches scientific services

The Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) based in Edinburgh has launched a range of new services to help companies minimise the environmental and health risks of working with nanomaterials.

Posted: Jan 9th, 2008

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Purging nanotechnology's innovation bottleneck

There is plenty of innovation in micro- and nanotechnologies, but bringing new devices to market is often prohibitively expensive. Many micro devices have small production volumes, while design, packaging and testing are costly. Now European researchers are breaking down the barriers by developing design methodologies that focus on manufacturing, packaging and testing.

Posted: Jan 9th, 2008

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United we compute: FermiGrid continues to yield results

The birth of FermiGrid, an initiative aiming to unite all of Fermilab's computing resources into a single grid infrastructure, changed the way that computing was done at the lab, improving efficiency and making better use of these resources along the way.

Posted: Jan 9th, 2008

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Future rests with biomedical scientists

With barriers between disciplines vanishing, there is need for biomedical scientists to familiarise themselves with subjects such as electronics, computers, and nanotechnology to take research forward.

Posted: Jan 9th, 2008

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