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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Rice wins innovation award for NanoJapan program

NanoJapan, a unique, Rice University-based program that combines a traditional study abroad experience in Japan with a targeted undergraduate research internship in nanotechnology, has been awarded the Institute of International Education's (IIE) prestigious Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovation in International Education.

Posted: Jan 28th, 2008

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EPA takes first step In filling nanotechnology information gaps

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published today in the Federal Register its plan for the Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The plan takes a positive first step by offering industry, non-governmental organizations and other groups the opportunity to voluntarily submit safety data on engineered nanoscale materials.

Posted: Jan 28th, 2008

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Brain Drain: America needs more money for science

Increased funding, training students and teachers in science, math and related fields, and attracting high-skilled immigrants should be the key mantras for America to maintain its competitive edge in a global world, scientists and industry leaders say.

Posted: Jan 28th, 2008

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Defense department funds study of carbon nanotube-based drug

The Department of Defense has commissioned a nine-month study from Rice University chemists and scientists in the Texas Medical Center to determine whether a new drug based on carbon nanotubes can help prevent people from dying of acute radiation injury following radiation exposure. The new study was commissioned after preliminary tests found the drug was greater than 5,000 times more effective at reducing the effects of acute radiation injury than the most effective drugs currently available.

Posted: Jan 28th, 2008

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Programming biomolecular self-assembly pathways

Nature knows how to make proteins and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) dance to assemble and sustain life. Inspired by this proof of principle, researchers at the California Institute of Technology have demonstrated that it is possible to program the pathways by which DNA strands self-assemble and disassemble, and hence to control the dynamic function of the molecules as they traverse these pathways.

Posted: Jan 26th, 2008

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Who are the rising stars in the new generation of chemists?

In Tomorrow's Chemistry Today, Bruno Pignataro has selected the rising stars of the new generation of chemists and compiled their innovative and award-winning research projects in one volume. Read Tomorrow's Chemistry Today and spot a future Nobel Prize winner or a development that may change the face of science.

Posted: Jan 25th, 2008

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FP7 one year on: revolutionary and working, says Potocnik

The EU's Seventh Framework (FP7), now one year into its seven-year life span, is a 'kind of transition programme', taking Europe's research community in the direction of the new instruments that were introduced last year, said EU Science and Research Commissioner Janez Potocnik.

Posted: Jan 25th, 2008

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EU project on intelligent materials to regenerate bone tissue

The Nanobiocom project, funded under the EU's Sixth Framework Programme (FP6), is working on the regeneration and repair of bone tissue. Its aim is to come up with a substitute for bone tissue that can repair the bone and regenerate it in such a way that it will be able to carry out similar functions to those in its natural state.

Posted: Jan 25th, 2008

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Scripps scientists develop new method for creating self-assembling, nanoscale materials

While biomedical, electronics, and other branches of research are marching steadily into the realm of the smaller-than-small nanometer scale, building needed materials at this scale has been problematic. This week, however, a team from The Scripps Research Institute unveiled a novel approach to the problem that yields a material with novel properties, which some might find reminiscent of Flubber. The material is produced using naturally occurring proteins as templates for uniform, self-assembled, nano-scale construction.

Posted: Jan 25th, 2008

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