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Space Exploration News

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astrophysics, cosmology, the universe...

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First sightings of solar flare phenomena confirm 3D models of space weather (w/video)

Scientists have for the first time witnessed the mechanism behind explosive energy releases in the Sun's atmosphere, confirming new theories about how solar flares are created. New footage put together by an international team led by University of Cambridge researchers shows how entangled magnetic field lines looping from the Sun's surface slip around each other and lead to an eruption 35 times the size of the Earth and an explosive release of magnetic energy into space.

Posted: Mar 27th, 2014

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New planet-like body found sneaking through the inner Oort cloud

A new, planet-like body has been found on the outer edges of the solar system. This object is the second body of its class found since the identification of the dwarf planet Sedna in 2003. It joins an exclusive club composed of some of the strangest objects in the solar system.

Posted: Mar 26th, 2014

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Dark energy hides behind phantom fields

Quintessence and phantom fields, two hypotheses formulated using data from satellites, such as Planck and WMAP, are among the many theories that try to explain the nature of dark energy. Now researchers suggest that both possibilities are only a mirage in the observations and it is the quantum vacuum which could be behind this energy that moves our universe.

Posted: Mar 26th, 2014

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Philae lander - nearing the end of hibernation

A rocket launch in March 2004, multiple swing-bys past Earth and Mars, high-speed fly-bys of asteroids Steins and Lutetia - after all this, the Philae lander on board ESA's Rosetta spacecraft, which is en route to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is in good shape.

Posted: Mar 26th, 2014

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Team observe closest milemarker supernova in generation

Researcher have intently studied the closest type Ia supernova discovered in a generation. The proximity to Earth could yield better understanding of this particular type of supernova that astronomers use to gauge distances in the universe and learn about its expansion history.

Posted: Mar 25th, 2014

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Don't forget F-type stars in search for life

F-type stars, more massive and hotter than our sun, warrant more consideration as spots to look for habitable planets, according to a newly published study that also examined potential damage to DNA from UV radiation.

Posted: Mar 25th, 2014

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Simple, like a neutron star

New research demonstrates that in certain respects these stars can instead be described very simply and that they show similarities with black holes.

Posted: Mar 25th, 2014

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Plugging the hole in Hawking's black hole theory (w/video)

Recently physicists have been poking holes again in Stephen Hawking's black hole theory - including Hawking himself. Now professor Chris Adami, Michigan State University, has jumped into the fray. He believes he has solved the decades-old information paradox debate in a groundbreaking new study.

Posted: Mar 24th, 2014

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Like being inside a star

Scientists used a simulation model that is far more accurate than previously used, and carried out an experiment to test a hypothesis about the behaviour of hydrogen that is splitting the scientific community.

Posted: Mar 24th, 2014

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Surface of Titan Sea is mirror smooth

Using radar measurements gathered by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, geophysicists have concluded that the surface of Ligeia Mare, Titan's second largest sea, has a mirror-like smoothness, possibly due to a lack of winds. As the only other solar system body with an Earth-like weather system, Titan could serve as a model for studying our own planet's early history.

Posted: Mar 20th, 2014

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Van Allen Probes reveal 'zebra stripes' structure in Earth's inner radiation belt

Scientists have discovered a new, persistent structure in Earth's inner radiation belt using data from the twin NASA Van Allen Probes spacecraft. Most surprisingly, this structure is produced by the slow rotation of Earth, previously considered incapable of affecting the motion of radiation belt particles, which have velocities approaching the speed of light.

Posted: Mar 19th, 2014

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