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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

NSF grant to study the synthesis of nanoparticles resembling stainless steel

Mathew M. Maye, associate professor of chemistry, has been awarded a three-year, $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award supports his ongoing work with metal stainless alloy nanostructures, the results of which may impact gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis, and rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

Posted: Jul 21st, 2014

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New spongelike structure converts solar energy into steam

The structure - a layer of graphite flakes and an underlying carbon foam - is a porous, insulating material structure that floats on water. When sunlight hits the structure's surface, it creates a hotspot in the graphite, drawing water up through the material's pores, where it evaporates as steam.

Posted: Jul 21st, 2014

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A noble gas cage

New material traps gases from nuclear fuel better and uses less energy than currently available options.

Posted: Jul 20th, 2014

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New metamaterial puts a twist in light

Scientists have uncovered the secret to twisting light at will. It is the latest step in the development of photonics, the faster, more compact and less carbon-hungry successor to electronics.

Posted: Jul 18th, 2014

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Future electronics may depend on lasers, not quartz

Nearly all electronics require devices called oscillators that create precise frequencies - frequencies used to keep time in wristwatches or to transmit reliable signals to radios. For nearly a century, these oscillators have relied upon quartz crystals to provide a frequency reference, much like a tuning fork is used as a reference to tune a piano. A new approach could ultimately replace the quartz crystal frequency reference - technology in use since the 1920s.

Posted: Jul 17th, 2014

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'Nanocamera' takes pictures at distances smaller than light's own wavelength

Researchers have demonstrated that an array of novel gold, pillar-bowtie nanoantennas can be used like traditional photographic film to record light for distances that are much smaller than the wavelength of light. A standard optical microscope acts as a 'nanocamera' whereas the pillar-bowtie nanoantennas are the analogous film.

Posted: Jul 17th, 2014

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