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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Cellular construction methods emulated

Not only is our body made of individual organs, our cells themselves are made of tiny organelles, a variety of separate compartments that fulfill different tasks. Such functional, nanostructured systems would also be useful for technical applications, such as biosensors, self-repairing materials, optoelectronic components, or nanocapsules. However, it has not been possible to recreate structures with sufficient complexity in the lab. Researchers in the Netherlands are now pursuing a new angle.

Posted: Mar 5th, 2008

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Quatar Foundation to hold symposium on nanomedicine

Qatar Foundation will organize an international symposium on applied nanomedicine in an effort to acquaint the local community with the utility of this futuristic medical science from March 9 to 10 at the Doha Sheraton Hotel.

Posted: Mar 4th, 2008

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Physicist earns patent for materials weakness detection system

The first patent awarded to Southeastern Louisiana University through one of its faculty has the potential to identify weaknesses in structures ranging from massive bridge construction to the tiniest elements of nanotechnology no larger than a speck of dust on a pinhead.

Posted: Mar 4th, 2008

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Pentagon releases new analysis of China’s military development and strategy

The Pentagon on Monday released its latest analysis of China's military development and strategy and says that the country spent as much as $139 billion, more than three times its announced defense budget, modernizing its military forces last year and that China has gone from virtually no research or funding in nanotechnologies and processes five years ago, to being a close second to the United States in total government investment.

Posted: Mar 4th, 2008

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Biological electron transfer captured in real time

Two research teams led by Dr. Michael Verkhovsky and Prof. Marten Wikstrom of the Institute of Biotechnology of the University of Helsinki have for the first time succeeded in monitoring electron transfer by Complex I in real time. In the future, this work might, for example, have medical relevance, because most of the maternally inherited so-called mitochondrial diseases are caused by dysfunction of Complex I.

Posted: Mar 3rd, 2008

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Appelbaum wins NSF Career Award for research on silicon spintronics

Ian Appelbaum, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Delaware, has received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation for his pioneering research in the exciting next evolution of electronics known as spintronics.

Posted: Mar 3rd, 2008

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The march of the carbon nanotubes

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory researchers have surpassed by a surprising margin the Department of Energy's goal for storing hydrogen within a unique material called carbon nanotubes.

Posted: Mar 3rd, 2008

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Rochester Institute of Technology to host new Pollution Prevention Institute

Governor Eliot Spitzer today announced the selection of the Rochester Institute of Technology as the host of the Pollution Prevention Institute, a cutting-edge research and development center to design and test 'green' manufacturing methods and provide technical support to businesses for pollution reduction measures that will help make them more competitive.

Posted: Mar 3rd, 2008

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Nanomedicine system engineered to enhance therapeutic effects of injectable drugs

In an article featured on the cover of the March issue of Nature Nanotechnology, Mauro Ferrari of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston presented a proof-of-concept study on a new multistage delivery system (MDS) for imaging and therapeutic applications. This discovery could go a long way toward making injectable drugs more effective.

Posted: Mar 3rd, 2008

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Physicists discover gold can be magnetic on the nanoscale

Physicists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have made important findings regarding gold on the nanoscale. They found that applying an electrical field on a surface-supported gold nanocluster changes its structure from a three-dimensional one to a planar flat structure. In another paper, they relate their discovery that gold in this size regime can be made magnetic through oxygenation of gold nanowires.

Posted: Mar 3rd, 2008

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