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technologies – renewables, energy savings, fuel cells

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Arctic sea ice helps remove CO2 from the atmosphere

Climate change is a fact, and most of the warming is caused by human activity. The Arctic is now so warm that the extent of sea ice has decreased by about 30 percent in summer and in winter, sea ice is getting thinner. New research has shown that sea ice removes CO2 from the atmosphere. If Arctic sea ice is reduced, we may therefore be facing an increase of atmospheric concentration of CO2, researchers warn.

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2014

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Ternary blend polymer solar cells with enhanced power conversion efficiency

Researchers identified a new polymer that improved the efficiency of solar cells. They also determined the method by which the polymer improved the cells' efficiency. The polymer allows electrical charges to move more easily throughout the cell, boosting the production of electricity - a mechanism never before demonstrated in such devices.

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2014

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ARPA-E grant to develop 'hot' solar cells

ARPA-E has awarded $2,540,000 to develop dual-junction solar cells that can operate efficiently at extreme temperatures above 750 degrees Fahrenheit. In addition to converting a portion of the sunlight directly into electricity, the solar cells will use the remainder of the light to heat high-temperature fluids that can drive a steam turbine or be stored for later use.

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2014

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Improving road safety for quad class electric vehicles

Traffic experts warn that the current safety standards of the L7E vehicle class ('quad class') are not sufficient for wide-scale deployment in traffic. Researchers of the Visio.M consortium's Safety subproject have accepted this challenge and are now demonstrating how even light and efficient electric vehicles can achieve an acceptable level of safety.

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2014

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The first microbe-powered, self-sustaining wastewater treatment system

Researchers have developed a unique method to use microbes buried in pond sediment to power waste cleanup in rural areas. The first microbe-powered, self-sustaining wastewater treatment system could lead to an inexpensive and quick way to clean up waste from large farming operations and rural sewage treatment plants while reducing pollution.

Posted: Sep 19th, 2014

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Megacities carbon project named 'Project to Watch' by United Nations

A greenhouse gas field measurement research program developed by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and several collaborating institutions has been named a 'Project to Watch' by a United Nations organization that focuses on harnessing big data for worldwide benefit.

Posted: Sep 16th, 2014

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